Bringing the outdoors in has reached new heights thanks to Japanese artist Makoto Azuma.   In collaboration with Unitika, Azuma has managed to create a living moss carpet.

Dubbed “Terramac,” this moss carpet is created using a tight mesh of 3D-knitted, plant-based polylactic acid fibers underneath which supports the roots and can be “decomposed (biodegraded) by microorganisms in compost or in soil after 10 years. Eventually only carbon dioxide and water remain.

TERRAMAC is named by combining “TERRA” meaning “earth” or “mother earth” and “MAC” meaning “Son” in Latin. The name, TERRAMAC, expresses “children (sons) of the mother earth” and carries an image of the “products friendly to the earth and loved by all animate being[s].”


WE MAKE CARPETS, consisting of Marcia Nolte, Stijn van der Vleuten and Bob Waardenburg, mix traditional skills and a critical view of the consumer society in unusual carpets.

We all know carpets. The word is derived from the Persian ‘tafta’ and literally means woven. Weaving carpets is a centuries-old tradition, which flourished in (Flemish) Brabant in the 13th century. Throughout the centuries, the carpet industry was leading in designing graphic patterns. The decorative carpets were, in this way, at the cradle of what we now call applied art. Owning this labour-intensive product was associated with wealth, prestige and power. The acoustic and insulating function often came in second place.

In line with the recent revaluation of the craft (in combination with present-day techniques), WE MAKE CARPETS makes a contemporary interpretation of this centuries-old medium. The weaving method, use of materials and patterns reflect the 21st century. At a distance, we simply see a decorative carpet. Closer inspection will, however, surprise us. WE MAKE CARPETS sampled analog everyday items of use into carpets with impressive sizes. Products that normally have no value once they have been used, such as plastic forks, plasters, paving tiles, pasta, cotton balls and pegs are arranged in an inventive way to form a graphic pattern. WE MAKE CARPETS are inspired by the colour, shape and possibilities of the material chosen. The result is not just a decorative carpet, but an object that makes us think about the consumer society that produces these ‘weaving materials’. A contemporary interpretation of wealth.

Dennis Elbers, curator MOTI (former Graphic Design Museum), Breda, The Netherlands


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The new Bidoun, on newsstands in April, considers art and patronage, state-sponsored media, cultural diplomacy, revolution and counterrevolution, nation and/or corporate branding, and even potato chips as public relations.
The heart of Soft Power is a suite of conversations that revolve around the question of hidden agendas. As’ad AbuKhalil, the political scientist who blogs as The Angry Arab, discusses the political economy of Al Jazeera and Qatar’s foreign policy with Babak Radboy and E. P. Licursi. Bangalore-based Achal Prabhala and Michael C. Vazquez consider the curious legacy of Cold War magazines funded by the American CIA. And nearly a dozen leading figures in the Egyptian cultural scene, including representatives of human rights organizations, art spaces, and foundations, as well as bloggers, activists, and curators, were invited to reflect on the theme of foreign funding.
-Bidoun

The new Bidoun, on newsstands in April, considers art and patronage, state-sponsored media, cultural diplomacy, revolution and counterrevolution, nation and/or corporate branding, and even potato chips as public relations.

The heart of Soft Power is a suite of conversations that revolve around the question of hidden agendas. As’ad AbuKhalil, the political scientist who blogs as The Angry Arab, discusses the political economy of Al Jazeera and Qatar’s foreign policy with Babak Radboy and E. P. Licursi. Bangalore-based Achal Prabhala and Michael C. Vazquez consider the curious legacy of Cold War magazines funded by the American CIA. And nearly a dozen leading figures in the Egyptian cultural scene, including representatives of human rights organizations, art spaces, and foundations, as well as bloggers, activists, and curators, were invited to reflect on the theme of foreign funding.

-Bidoun